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Is The NBA Too Black?

Oh boy.
Not this question.
This is the question that no one in the NBA actually wants to address.
They want to pretend like it is not unusual.
But it is.
Blacks make up most of the NBA.
Yet no one talks about it.
It is like we are afraid to mention it.
Sure everyone will lose it about the Oscars being so white, but the NBA being so black is not that big of a deal.
Well, first off let’s get the numbers straight.
75% of the NBA players are black.
That is alot higher than any other league.
If the company you worked at had that high of a number, then they would be in trouble for racial inequality.
So the number is high.
That doesn’t make it a problem, right?
What is wrong with having a lot of brothers out on the court?
That isn’t the problem.
The problem is the NBA’s acceptance of the hip-hop culture as a whole.
Woah!
You are so racist for saying that!
How could you!

Listen to me for a minute.
The NBA back in the 90’s made a connection between basketball and hip-hop to promote the game.
They had fans link their love for basketball with their love for hip-hop, which they presented as a cool and hip thing to be apart of.
I mean, of all the professional sports, basketball is the one that has what you can call a musical style.
Baseball doesn’t have it.
Hockey doesn’t.
Football doesn’t.
But basketball does.
When you think of basketball you think of a hip-hop song playing in the background as a guy dunks the ball.
Lebron James had a documentary made about his high school days and what song was the feature track for the movie?
Not surprisingly, a Drake song.
Go to a college game or even a high school game and what type of song is playing in the background?
You guessed it.
Hip-hop.
I never heard a country song played during warm-ups.
Is that bad that the NBA embraced this culture?
No.
They have every right to.
And what is so bad about it anyway?
That they talk about sex and drugs?
What genre of music doesn’t?
What? That the genre isn’t that great?
Well, that still shouldn’t allow the NBA to utilize it as a promotional tool.
The problem is that the NBA isolates fans who don’t feel a connection to that culture.
That isn’t about race.
It’s about a sport trying to capitalize on a movement in music.
But what if you don’t like it?
You aren’t into the music or the style.
But you still like basketball.
You feel an odd confusion with the sport.
You love basketball, but don’t love the culture it has come to represent.
As you sit down to watch the game there is a bunch of music being blasted that you don’t care much for.
It may not hurt your love, but it doesn’t help it.
To say that the NBA is too black would be putting blame on the wrong people, the players.
Can you blame a person for their skin color?
Come on now, that is unfair and ignorant.
It’s not Lebron’s fault that he is black.
But posing the question as, “Is The NBA Too Black?” is making it seem like being black is the problem.
It’s not.
You can however blame the league for identifying themselves with hip-hop.
For forcing their fans to embrace a certain culture that they make not even like.
This isn’t as much of hip-hop’s fault, as it is the NBA’s.
If the NBA forced country or rock onto their fans, I’d be saying the same thing.
Sell the game.
Don’t sell a style.
But that is what the NBA did.
And they have to deal with the fact that most of the current NBA players are supposed to be reflections of that culture, the hip-hop culture.
And not everyone likes what they are selling.
Since they are not just selling the game of basketball.

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About Theodore Ficklestein (97 Articles)
Theodore Ficklestein is a blogger, author and writer whose blog post you may have just read. He has written three poetry books and has a upcoming novel being released in 2017. You support his work by becoming a patron on his Patreon page.

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